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Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) & the Aging Population    
As the baby boomer cohort approaches retirement age, vision loss and illness among the elderly will reach near-crisis proportions. Aging is the greatest risk factor for vision loss, and the leading cause of that loss is age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a condition that causes irreversible damage to vision. At the back of the eye, there is a thin layer of light-sensitive tissue called the retina. Light is focused behind the retina onto a small spot called the macula. The macula then pr...Read More
 
AMD     
AMD occurs when the macula, the area at the back of the retina that produces the sharpest vision, deteriorates over time. Women younger than age 75 years who eat diets rich in the yellow plant pigments lutein and zeaxanthin may have a reduced risk of developing AMD Women younger than age 75 years who eat diets rich in the yellow plant pigments lutein and zeaxanthin may have a reduced risk of developing the eye disease age-related macular degeneration, according to a report in the August issue o...Read More
 
AMD Discovery     
AMD Discovery: New Hope for Treatment of Vision Loss "This discovery brings us one step closer to treating dry AMD which could significantly improve the quality of life of seniors who are most affected by this eye disease" Scientists have won a major battle in the fight against age-related macular degeneration or AMD a blinding eye disease that affects millions of people. An international team led by researchers at Sainte-Justine Hospital and the Université de Montréal has iden...Read More
 
AMD Protection May Come From Select Veggies     
AMD occurs when the macula the area at the back of the retina that produces the sharpest vision deteriorates over time. Women younger than age 75 years who eat diets rich in the yellow plant pigments lutein and zeaxanthin may have a reduced risk of developing AMD Women younger than age 75 years who eat diets rich in the yellow plant pigments lutein and zeaxanthin may have a reduced risk of developing the eye disease age-related macular degeneration according to a report in the August issue of A...Read More
 
AMD: Healthy Eating is Essential for Saving Your Vision    
Introduction Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD)  is one of the most common causes of irreversible vision loss in developed countries. Estimates of how many people are affected vary considerably, but the percentage of the population with it increases with age. While only 2% of people aged 50 to 59 have the disease, the incidence rises to nearly 30% by the age of 75 years. Therefore, the greatest risk factor for developing this condition is age....Read More
 
AMD: Known Risk Factors    
Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)  is one of the leading causes of blindness in Canada and the US. AMD is an irreversible type of progressive degeneration of the area of the retina that is most important for sharp, clear vision. While AMD is not curable, it is possible to reduce the risk of developing this devastating condition and slowing down the rate of progression. The photograph shows deposits in the retina (light colored spots) and leaking blood...Read More
 
AMD: The Role of Genetic Testing in the Use of Ocular Multivitamin Supplements    
Vision Preservation and Your DNA Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)  is one of the leading causes of blindness in North America, due to its progressive disease course and its devastating effects on central vision loss. AMD is classified into two main categories based on damage to the macular area of the retina as  dry AMD , seen in patients with early signs of deposits in the retina, and  wet AMD , a later, more aggressive stage of t...Read More
 
AMD: The Sneak Thief of Vision    
Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)  is considered to be the leading cause of functional vision loss in people over the age of 55 in the western world. Estimates of how many people are affected vary considerably, but the percentage of the population with it increases with age. While only 2% of people aged 50 to 59 have the disease, the incidence rises to nearly 30% by the age of 75 years. Therefore, the greatest risk factor for developing this condition is age. There is important ne...Read More
 
Amsler Grid Instructions    
People who have been diagnosed with Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD or AMD) are often given a card or sheet of paper printed with a grid of squares and a dot in the center. This is known as an Amsler Grid; this is a handy device designed for monitoring your own vision at home. AMD can progress slowly, or quickly, so it is a good idea to monitor your own vision at home for changes that may happen between vision checkups in your eyecare practitioner’s office. ...Read More
 
AREDS: The Age-Related Eye Disease Study    
Everyone over the age of 55 should have an eye exam to determine their risk of developing advanced AMD. In 1992 the U.S. National Eye Institute initiated the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) to see if high doses of antioxidants and zinc would have any effect on people with AMD. The goal was to determine if these supplements could help stop or slow down the progression of AMD and vision loss. There were 3 640 people between the ages of 55 and 80 who participated in the study. By the time...Read More
 
Can Healthful Eating Save Your Eyes?     
Can Healthful Eating Save Your Eyes? Antioxidant supplements could slow age-related macular degeneration A past large study showed that high doses of antioxidant supplements might slow a person s progression from early to late AMD. Studies now suggest that the healthful eating habits recommended to lower your risk of cancer may also help prevent the most common cause of irreversible blindness that occurs among people in developed countries. Although age-related macular dege...Read More
 
Choroidal Neovascular Membrane     
In the eye, between the retina and the sclera (what is known as the “white of the eye”) is a structure called the choroid . The choroid is highly vascular, meaning that it has many blood vessels, which have the function of bringing nutrients and oxygen to the nerve cells of the retina, particularly those near the macula. Separating the choroid and the retina is a thin layer of tissue known as Bruch’s membrane , which has the job of keeping the choroid from...Read More
 
Fluorescein Angiography     
Most people do not know that the only place in the human body where blood vessels can be viewed in their natural state, without cutting something open, is in the back of the eye. For this reason, the eye is one of the best places to evaluate diseases and conditions that affect the circulation; what is happening in the ocular blood vessels is also happening elsewhere in the body. For this reason, Fluorescein Angiography (FA) , a test in which the vegetabl...Read More
 
Macular Degeneration: The Sneak Thief of Vision    
Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)  is considered to be the leading cause of functional vision loss in people over the age of 55 in the western world. Estimates of how many people are affected vary considerably, but the percentage of the population with it increases with age. While only 2% of people aged 50 to 59 have the disease, the incidence rises to nearly 30% by the age of 75 years. Therefore, the greatest risk factor for developing this condition is age. There is important ne...Read More
 
OCT - OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY    
This revolutionary test allows doctors an opportunity to better understand and view disease progression of the macula, the retina and the optic nerve long before actual vision loss takes place. Routine analysis of the retina utilizes manual and photographic views of the top layers or simply its surface. OCT tomography provides a more detailed look at the retina with a three-dimensional side-view or optical cross-section. This procedure provides a more precise analysis of the i...Read More
 
Preventing AMD Through Nutrition     
Age-related macular degeneration commonly referred to as AMD is a disease in which the tissue in the macula deteriorates. The macula is located in the central part of the retina and is responsible for producing sharp central vision. The exact causes of AMD are still unknown although age and heredity appear to be the dominant factors. This condition can result in severely diminished central vision but peripheral vision remains unaffected. In most cases it is impossible to restore the vision loss...Read More
 
Smoking Raises Risk Of AMD     
The researchers also found that fish rich in omega-3 oils can protect people from developing the illness later in life If you are male and smoke you have a significantly higher risk of developing AMD later in life than a person who does not smoke. If you are male and smoke you have a significantly higher risk of developing age-related macular degeneration later in life than a person who does not smoke according to a study carried out by Dr. Johanna M. Seddon director of the Epidemiology Unit Ma...Read More
 
The Age-Related Eye Disease Study     
Everyone over the age of 55 should have an eye exam to determine their risk of developing advanced AMD. In 1992 the U.S. National Eye Institute initiated the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) to see if high doses of antioxidants and zinc would have any effect on people with AMD. The goal was to determine if these supplements could help stop or slow down the progression of AMD and vision loss. There were 3 640 people between the ages of 55 and 80 who participated in the study. By the time...Read More
 
 
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